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Monday, February 27, 2017

Social Security Disability and Epilepsy

Am I eligible to receive SSDI if I have epilepsy?

Epilepsy is a serious condition that impacts an estimated three million people each year.  Individuals with epilepsy may suffer seizures during the day or while asleep.  Their severity and intensity vary depending on the patient.  Along with convulsive or non-convulsive seizures, an epileptic will often experience fatigue, communication issues, and other disturbing symptoms following each seizure episode.  Epilepsy can be debilitating and could make it difficult, if not impossible to maintain employment.  

Social Security Disability benefits are intended to assist individuals no longer capable of working for a prolonged period of time due to a qualifying illness or condition.  If you suffer from epilepsy, whether it is due to another condition like cerebral palsy or has no known cause, you may be eligible to seek Social Security Disability benefits to assist with your expenses.

Filing for SSDI

Anyone with epilepsy who is unable to work due to their condition should contact a New York City Social Security Disability Lawyer.  With your attorney’s assistance, you can prepare a thorough and complete application for benefits that provides you with the strongest chance of receiving the financial assistance you need.  Your SSDI application should include:

  • Your diagnosis of epilepsy;
  • A detailed description of your symptoms and frequency of seizures;
  • A statement from your doctor describing your condition;
  • Results from an EEG;
  • Detailed treatment history, including your response to medications.

The Social Security Administration provides a list of disorders that may qualify for benefits.  Epilepsy is included under listing 11.02.  The disorder is broken down into frequent seizures and less frequent seizures.  To obtain benefits for frequent seizures, you will need to show that you suffer grand mal seizures at least once a month for three consecutive months or you experience dyscognitive seizures at least once a week for three consecutive months.

Those with less frequent seizures may still be able to qualify if the patient can show he or she has a severe limitation due to seizures, such as the inability to remember or function physically.  Applicants should understand that the SSDI application process is complex and difficult to navigate.  Contact a SSDI lawyer for individualized assistance with your benefits case.


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